Traitement en cour, merci de patienter...
Traitement en cour, merci de patienter...
Saut de ligne
Image
RES MILITARIS - Revue européenne d'études militaires - European Journal of Military Studies
Image
Saut de ligne
Saut de ligne
Image
Saut de ligne
Search this journal
Recherche
Saut de ligne
Séparateur

Current issue
Numéro en cours

Image
Séparateur

Access previous issues
Archives

Image
Séparateur

RES MILITARIS

Image
Séparateur

E-mail alerts

If you wish to be notified of the next issue of Res Militaris as soon as it comes on line, please specify your e-mail address.
Image
Image
Saut de ligne

Alerte

Soyez informé dès la parution d'un nouveau numéro de Res Militaris.
Image
Image
Saut de ligne
Saut de ligne
Séparateur

RSS feeds - Flux de syndication

Image
Image
Séparateur

For potential contributors - Instructions aux contributeurs potentiels

Image
Séparateur
Image
Geneva Foundation for Governance & Public Policy
Geneva Foundation for Governance and Public Policy
Logo GGSG
The Geneva Graduate School of Governance
Image
Saut de ligne

ISSN° 2265-6294

Saut de ligne
Saut de ligne
RES MILITARIS - Revue européenne d'études militaires
Saut de ligne
RES MILITARIS - European Journal of Military Studies
Image
© artSILENSEcom - Fotolia.com
ISSN° 2265-6294
Saut de ligne
Ergomas
Image
Apart from its regular offerings, Res Militaris publishes special thematic issues at the pace of one, two ot three a year. On that basis, starting in 2015, the journal will notably carry articles by Fellows of the European Research Group on the Military and Society (ERGOMAS), thus serving as that association's official publication vehicle.
Image
Res Militaris is a bilingual (English, French), on-line social science journal dedicated to the study of military- and security-related issues, broadly defined. It is made possible in part by generous support from the Geneva Foundation for Governance and Public Policy.
Image
Image
Saut de ligne
Res Militaris est une revue en ligne bilingue (anglais, français) de sciences sociales tournée vers l'étude des questions militaires et de sécurité, au sens le plus large. Elle bénéficie du soutien de la Fondation de Genève pour la Gouvernance et les Politiques Publiques.
 
En plus de ses deux numéros annuels réguliers, Res Militaris publie des numéros thématiques hors-série au rythme d'une, deux ou trois livraisons par an. À ce titre, à compter de 2015, la revue éditera notamment des numéros à thème proposés par le Groupe Européen de Recherche sur les Armées et la Société (ERGOMAS), faisant ainsi office, pour cette association scientifique, de vecteur officiel de publication.
Image
Image
Image
Saut de ligne
RES MILITARIS - Revue européenne d'études militaires
Saut de ligne
Current issue - Numéro en cours
Hors-série | France : opérations récentes, enjeux futurs, décembre 2016
Saut de ligne
RES MILITARIS - European Journal of Military Studies
Saut de ligne
Image
Saut de ligne

Contents of this issue
 
This special issue, guest-edited by Martine Cuttier, is French through and through. This owes much to the themes it addresses: France's recent military interventions overseas, and the future prospects of its defence establishment.
 
Among the range of French military operations of the last period, it chose to focus mainly on those conducted in Africa. It could no doubt have examined other deployments that have occupied centre stage in the same time frame, notably Afghanistan. However, as the journal already devoted a whole (Anglophone) ERGOMAS number lately to lessons learnt there, and its Francophone counterpart is in the pipeline, it was decided otherwise. But substantive reasons are in no short supply. One is that Africa is where France, on the strength of its ancient ties to various parts of the continent, intervenes on its own initiative, with a freedom of action that its status as junior partner (albeit of the first rank) in US-led coalitions will not afford elsewhere. Another is that world maps based on the criterion of the frequency and toll of violent episodes, whether they be political, religious or criminal, clearly show a concentration of such occurrences in Africa. Their destabilizing potential and the drag on its development they entail feed waves of immigration that Europe, which is one of their final destinations, finds it as difficult to control as the drug traffic flows that originate or transit there. To boot, terrorism has raised its head on African soil of late, and threatens the stability of local allies and partners, with possible repercussions in Europe. The sum total is that France has obvious strategic (not to mention economic) interests on the continent - it cannot afford to see its southern flank helplessly go to ruin. Hence the focus this issue places on Africa and the security problems (here, duly contextualized and updated) it raises, as part of its first theme.
 
Presumably because military action on the African theatre lends itself to such an emphasis, the contributions offered mainly deal with land operations. This led the guest editor to solicit and assemble authorized accounts of the concepts that prevail at the top of the French Army as to its medium- and long-term future.
 
As recent missions are apt to influence vision - at least in part : the proposed doctrine does not overlook the possibility of other contexts for future uses of force -, this issue will logically enough deal with them first.
 
The opening contribution, by Philippe Folliot (MP, secretary of the National Assembly's Defence Committee) and Emmanuel Dupuy, presents a panorama of French counter-terrorist activity, together with its ramifications, in the Sahel region and its surroundings. Against the backdrop thus offered, Olivier Hanne's article examines the (positive, though nuanced) lessons to be drawn from Operation Barkane. Next, Gregor Mathias revisits a study on Operation Serval and its probable outcomes that he conducted and published in March 2013, only three months after it started and then still in progress - a daring prospective exercise, to say the least - in order to assess in hindsight the degree of predictability of the various factors involved. The following piece, by Lt.-Gen. Bruno Clément-Bollée, expounds a method he applied in the field to ease conflict termination processes and their aftermath, with good results in Côte d'Ivoire and Guinea, but less than entirely satisfactory outcomes in Mali and the Central African Republic : he analyzes the reasons behind such differences. The next two articles, respectively signed by Myriam Arfoui and R-Adm. Jean Dufourcq, masterfully assess the geopolitical factors at work in the Mali crisis for the former, in the rise of regional security cooperation in and around the Sahel for the latter. The last contribution, by Christophe-Alexandre Paillard, opts for a wider focus : it probes the role played by the continent's raw materials, some of which are of high strategic interest to the defence industries of major powers, and both an economic blessing and a political curse (when used to finance local armed conflicts) for exporting countries.
 
The first article on the second theme is penned by the French Army's Chief of Staff, Gen. Jean-Pierre Bosser. It details the ends, means and roles envisaged for that service in coming years. Covering both external and internal security, it highlights the Army's emphasis on operational effectiveness as well as on the part it should continue to play in bolstering national cohesion, and displays the same breadth of outlook that inspires the recently published doctrinal document entitled “Action Terrestre Future”. The next piece, by Maj.-Gen. Bernard Barrera, Assistant Chief of the Army Staff for procurement and programmes, provides a picture of the daunting complexity involved in anticipating and planning for the capabilities that will be needed in decades ahead, and details the solutions chosen to meet that challenge. The third article, which bears the signature of Maj.-Gen. Vincent Desportes, gives voice to his strong advocacy of a substantial defence budget increase as well as for fewer restrictions on service members' freedom of expression on professional topics. Lt.-Col. Rémy Porte, the Army's Chief Historian, argues in the fourth piece in favour of a wider role for military history and historians in planning, conducting and evaluating future operations, and advances a number of practical proposals to that effect.
 
This issue aptly ends with Olivier Zajec's pointed critique of the “comprehensive approach” to military strategy that has prevailed in France and elsewhere in the West since the Cold War came to a close - a trend he sees as responsible for the repeated failure of effective tactics to deliver the intended strategic goods. The problem, he argues, is that such an approach all too often means that the overall political intent behind operations is lost sight of - a most unfortunate tendency as “no offsetting mechanism can ever compensate for the absence of a meaningful political objective”.
 
Happy reading!
Bernard Boëne
Martine Cuttier
Saut de ligne

Présentation du numéro
 
Pilotée par Martine Cuttier, la présente livraison est intégralement française. Elle le doit aux thématiques retenues: les opérations militaires récentes menées par la France, et les perspectives d'évolution de son outil militaire.
 
Sans doute parce que l'action militaire sur le continent africain s'y prête, ce numéro spécial se penche à titre principal sur sa dimension terrestre. C'est la raison qui a poussé à solliciter et réunir des témoignages autorisés sur les conceptions qui prévalent à son sommet quant au futur à moyen et long terme de l'armée de Terre française.
 
S'agissant des premières, ce numéro spécial privilégie le théâtre africain. Il aurait sans doute pu s'intéresser à d'autres opérations qui ont occupé le devant de la scène au cours des dernières années, et au premier chef à l'épisode afghan. Les circonstances propres à la revue en ont décidé autrement : Res Militaris a déjà consacré un numéro anglophone entier aux leçons de l'Afghanistan, et son pendant francophone se profile pour l'année qui vient. Mais les justifications de fond ne manquent pas. C'est en Afrique que la France, forte de ses liens anciens avec certaines parties du continent, est à l'initiative et à l'œuvre - avec une liberté d'action que, sur d'autres théâtres extérieurs, son statut de junior partner (fût-il du premier rang) au sein de coalitions emmenées par les États-Unis (comme en Syrie) ne permet pas. Une autre raison est que la lecture des cartes du monde selon le critère de la fréquence et du bilan des violences, politiques, religieuses ou criminelles qui ont cours ici et là fait apparaître une forte concentration de ces phénomènes en Afrique. Déstabilisantes, paralysant les efforts de développement, ces violences favorisent une immigration que l'Europe, l'une de ses destinations principales, a du mal à maîtriser - tout comme les flux de stupéfiants qui naissent ou transitent par là. L'irruption récente du terrorisme en terre africaine menace la stabilité d'alliés ou partenaires locaux, et fait craindre des répercussions du même ordre en Europe. La France y a donc des intérêts stratégiques, sans parler de ses intérêts économiques. Ainsi s'explique le choix d'axer le premier thème de ce numéro sur l'Afrique et les questions de sécurité qu'elle soulève, dûment resituées dans leur contexte et ses dernières évolutions.
 
Les missions récentes étant de nature à éclairer la vision de l'avenir - au moins en partie : on verra que la doctrine ne fait pas d'impasse sur d'autres hypothèses d'emploi -, c'est logiquement par les premières qu'on commencera.
 
Le numéro s'ouvre avec la contribution de Philippe Folliot (député, secrétaire de la Commission de la Défense à l'Assemblée nationale) et Emmanuel Dupuy, qui dressent un précieux panorama des modalités, tenants et aboutissants des opérations antiterroristes françaises dans le Sahel et ses environs proches ou lointains ; elle sert de toile de fond aux suivantes. La deuxième, d'Olivier Hanne, s'intéresse au bilan, positif mais nuancé, qu'on peut tirer de l'opération Barkhane. Le troisième article est de Gregor Mathias, qui y revient sur l'opération Serval et sur l'étude prospective, éminemment risquée, qu'il y avait consacrée trois mois après son lancement, alors qu'elle était encore en cours : il y fait la part des facteurs qui étaient prévisibles et de ceux qui le sont moins. Vient ensuite, sous la plume du général Bruno Clément-Bollée, l'exposition d'une méthode de sortie de crise en Afrique, expérimentée avec d'excellents résultats en Côte d'Ivoire et en Guinée, avec de moins bons au Mali et en Centrafrique : l'auteur s'y attache à cerner les raisons de ces différences. Les deux contributions suivantes, que signent respectivement Myriam Arfaoui et l'amiral Jean Dufourcq, examinent magistralement le contexte géopolitique de la crise malienne pour la première citée, des États riverains du Sahel dans son ensemble et de la montée d'une coopération régionale de sécurité pour le second. Signé de Christophe-Alexandre Paillard, le dernier article sur l'Afrique élargit la focale en traitant des matières premières qu'elle recèle, dont nombre présentent un intérêt stratégique majeur pour les grandes puissances et leurs industries de défense, et qui sont pour les pays dont elles proviennent un atout majeur, mais souvent aussi, par les conflits locaux que leur exportation permet de financer, un fléau.
 
Le premier article relevant des enjeux à venir est celui que signe en personne le général Jean-Pierre Bosser, Chef d'état-major de l'armée de Terre. Il y détaille la vision des fins, moyens et rôles envisagés par cette armée pour les années à venir, vision large (elle mêle action extérieure et intérieure, souci de l'efficacité opérationnelle et rôle de l'armée dans la cohésion nationale) qui sous-tend la doctrine récemment officialisée avec la parution du document intitulé “Action Terrestre Future”. Le second est celui d'un de ses adjoints, le général Bernard Barrera, Sous-chef “Plans-Programmes” de l'EMAT : il y donne une idée de la complexité d'une programmation capacitaire qui engage l'avenir pour plusieurs décennies, et fournit un aperçu des solutions retenues. Le général Vincent Desportes est l'auteur de la contribution suivante, vigoureux plaidoyer pour une augmentation substantielle du budget de la Défense et un élargissement des restrictions qui en pratique pèsent sur la liberté d'expression des militaires même sur des sujets relevant de leurs compétences professionnelles. Un autre plaidoyer suit : celui du lieutenant-colonel Rémy Porte pour une intégration plus étroite de l'histoire et des historiens militaires dans la préparation, la conduite et le bilan des opérations.
 
Ce numéro spécial se clôt par la critique que propose Olivier Zajec de l'“approche globale” qui domine la pratique stratégique française et plus généralement occidentale depuis la fin de la Guerre froide, et selon lui explique pourquoi l'histoire se répète d'opérations tactiques pourtant brillamment menées qui ne produisent pas les résultats stratégiques escomptés. Le problème, tel qu'il le voit, est qu'une telle approche fait perdre de vue l'intention politique qui sous-tend les opérations : or, “en stratégie, il n'existe pas de mécanisme compensatoire à l'absence de sens politique de l'action”.
 
Bonne lecture !
Bernard Boëne
   Martine Cuttier
Saut de ligne
Image
RES MILITARIS
Saut de ligne